News

Here's the recent news from PQCNC.

As ASNS PQITs work to decrease antibiotic use in newborn and NICU infants, many different measures are being implemented to aid in accomplishing this goal.  Some teams began by defining at-risk criteria to determine a need for antibiotic administration while other teams implemented an antibiotic hard stop at 36 or 48 hours to automatically discontinue any antibiotics that had been ordered allowing for reassess Read more...
"Opioid abusers are more likely to live in the rural south.  22 out of the top 25 cities for opiod abuse rate are primarily rural and located in southern states.  Opioid abuse rates range from 11.6% of individuals in Wilmington, NC to 7.5% of individuals in Fort Smith AR who received an opioid prescription." Read more here Read more...
Interested in learning about Resilience tools?Enroll in the W.I.S.E.R Study (“Web-based Implementation of the Science for Enhancing Resilience”)Who: Healthcare workers 18 and older are eligibleWhat: • WISER is packages evidence-based resilience tools for busy healthcare workers. It is an interactive, text-message based intervention that lasts 2 months. Read more...
Dr. Kelly Kimple, the NC Acting State Health Director, is inviting you to meet on May 31st from 12:30-1:30 pm, by webinar, to outline the proposed role of hospitals in supporting North Carolina's implementation of recent federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) amendment under the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) legislation.  Read more...
What really happens in lab... Read more...
 If you've ever been to the doctor for unbearable sinus pain, or a sore throat, chances are you were prescribed antibiotics to help kick those ailments. But was that prescription necessary?Dr. Paul Cook, Chief of Infectious Diseases at ECU's Brody School of Medicine, says that most outpatient infections seen by primary care doctors will resolve on their own. Read more...
...Hepatitis B. Updated recommendations reflect that a monovalent birth dose should be administered to all newborns within 24 hours of birth. Revised wording indicates that infants born to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)–positive mothers should be tested for HBsAg and antibody to HBsAg at 9 through 12 months (rather than 9 through 18 months)....More here Read more...

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